Myths about Water

Adults can drink coffee, tea or cola as a substitute for water

False:
Coffee, tea and sweet beverages are ‎no substitute for water. In fact, ‎coffee and cola are believed to cause ‎dehydration.‎

Water has no taste

False:
Different water sources produce water with ‎different tastes. The substances dissolved in the water and water treatments determine water flavor.‎

Drinking cold, not lukewarm, water will increase my metabolism

False:
As long as we are well hydrated, our metabolism will remain at an optimum level, irrespective of water temperature.

I only need to drink when I’m thirsty

False:
We should drink water even when we’re not thirsty. Thirst alerts ‎ the brain when we’ve already lost too much ‎water.‎

Poor quality water tastes different to good quality water

False:
Many parameters determining water ‎quality, including harmful ones, are ‎tasteless. While the water we drink may taste fine, it doesn’t always mean it’s good quality.‎

I don’t sweat so I don’t need to drink ‎water

False:
The body constantly loses water to ‎balance its temperature. Although we ‎feel comfortable because sweat ‎evaporates, we still lose water and have to replenish it‎.

Drinking water can help me lose weight

True:
Water moderates the need for food, ‎improves metabolism and increases ‎waste discharge from the body, all of ‎which help maintain a balanced weight‎.

It’s not healthy to drink water when I eat ‎

False:
Drinking while eating will balance ‎the food intake, and will improve food ‎digestion. This is why physicians always ‎recommend drinking before and during ‎meals.

If I drink lime scale, I’ll develop kidney stones

False:
Lime scale is Calcium and Magnesium ‎coming into contact with heat. It’s absorbed in the body as essential minerals so ‎ it’s actually healthy.‎

Drinking water can put me in a good mood

True:
Water can change our mood by affecting ‎the body's water balance. Insufficient ‎drinking may cause us to be tired and indicate a bad mood. ‎

Drinking water can reduce hunger

True:
Thirst sometimes feels the same as hunger so drinking water can distract us from eating and keep us fuller between meals.

Drinking too much water might cause damage to my ‎kidneys

False:
Not drinking enough water makes the kidneys ‎overwork, which can ultimately result in kidney damage.‎